Oceanography

Oceanography in the Department includes ocean circulation and dynamics, air-sea interaction, chemical tracers and cycles, interactions with marine life, and the sedimentary record of past oceans and climates at timescales ranging from years to millions of years. An overarching goal is the study of the ocean's role in the global climate and marine ecosystems. Research programs involve observational, model, and theory components, and is highly interdisciplinary. The faculty have active programs across the globe, from tropical to polar environments, and coastal zones. Research includes study of the dynamics of sea ice, tropical ocean variability, El Niño and other climate oscillations, and ocean/glacial ice interaction. Chemical oceanography faculty examine the marine biogeochemical cycles of major and minor elements, including carbon and anthropogenic compounds in all their forms. They use both observational (measuring geochemical tracers at sea) and modeling approaches to understand ocean circulation, with a specific focus on the ocean's role in the carbon cycle, both today and in the past, and especially its contribution to absorbing anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Biological oceanography faculty study the intereactions of marine organisms with one another and with their physical and chemical environment to understand the their role of ocean biota in the global carbon cycle. Paleoceanography faculty reconstruct changes in surface and deep ocean circulation, changes in ocean productivity and chemistry, and changes in terrestrial environments. An important component of this research involves developing spatial and temporal records of climate change based on biological, chemical, mineralogical, and isotopic measurements on deep sea sediment samples and corals. Strong connections are maintained with the International Research Institute for Climate Prediction (IRI) and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies.

Hugh Ducklow
Personal Information
Hugh
Ducklow
Professor
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information
208 Geoscience
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8167

Fax: 

(845) 365-8163

Fields of interest: 

Ecosystems ecology, marine and global biogeochemistry, microbial ecology
Education
PhD
Harvard University
05/1977
MS
Harvard University
05/1974
AB
Harvard College
05/1972
Selected Publications:
Mixing regime-dependent causality between phytoplankton and bacteria in the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean ecosystem., Kim, H; Lee, DE; Ducklow, HW Marine Ecology Progress Series, Volume: 600 p.: 41-53 (2018)
Spring–summer net community production, new production, particle export and related water column biogeochemical processes in the marginal sea ice zone of the western Antarctic Peninsula 2012–2014, Ducklow, HW; Stukel, MR; Eveleth, R; Doney, SC; Jickells, T; Schofield, OM; Baker, AR; Brindle, J; Chance, R; Cassar, N. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A, Volume: 376 (2018) 10.1098/rsta.2017.0173
Bacterial community segmentation facilitates the prediction of ecosystem function along the coast of the western Antarctic Peninsula., Bowman, JS; Amaral-Zettler, LA; Rich, JJ; Luria, CM; Ducklow, HW ISME Journal (2017) 10.1038/ismej.2016.204
The Freshwater System West of the Antarctic Peninsula: Spatial and Temporal Changes, Meredith, M.P.; Venables, H. J.; Clarke, A.; Ducklow, H. W.; Erickson, M.; Leng, M. J.; Lenaerts, J. T. M.; van den Broeke, Mi. R. Journal of Climate, Volume: 26 p.: 1669-84 (2013)
What is the metabolic status of the oligotrophic ocean, Ducklow, H. W.; Doney, S. C. Annual Review of Marine Science, Volume: 5 p.: 15.1-15.9 (2012)
Production and Fate of Bacteria in the Oceans, Ducklow, H. W. Bioscience, Volume: 33, Issue: 8 p.: 494-501 (1983)
Andrew Juhl
Personal Information
Andrew
Juhl
Lamont Associate Research Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Biology and Paleo Environment
Adjunct Associate Professor
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Contact Information
122 Marine Biology
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8837

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150

Fields of interest: 

Plankton ecology, Phytoplankton growth and physiology, Zooplankton grazing, Harmful algae, Dinoflagellate blooms, Physical/biological interactions, Nutrient/microbial pollution of coastal waters, Sea-ice algae

As an aquatic ecologist and oceanographer, my research and teaching focus on how aquatic microorganisms and their predators interact with each other and their physical/chemical environment. I emphasize a holistic perspective encompassing the range of planktonic organisms found in coastal marine systems, estuaries, rivers and lakes, including: planktonic algae, protist microzooplankton, invertebrate zooplankton, and bacteria.    

My research approach links hypothesis-driven, controlled laboratory experiments with small-scale field manipulations and field observations. Such research is inherently interdisciplinary, connecting cell biology and physiology with ecology, and physics and chemistry of the environment. My work finds application in addressing basic and applied questions related to aquatic geochemical fluxes, harmful algal blooms, pollution and water quality, and sea ice ecology

Please see my website for more information.

 

 

 

Education
Ph.D. - Biological Oceanography
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego
2000
M. S. - Biological Oceanography
College of Oceanography, Oregon State University
1991
B.S. - Zoology
University of Wisconsin, Madison
1988
Selected Publications:
Overwintering of gelatinous zooplankton in the coastal arctic ocean, Purcell, Jennifer E.; Juhl, Andrew R.; Mańko, Maciej K.; Aumack, Craig F. Marine Ecology Progress Series (2017)
Conserved transcriptional responses to nutrient stress in bloom-forming algae, Harke, Matthew J; Juhl, Andrew R.; Haley, Sheean T.; Alexander, Harriet; Dyhrman, Sonya T. Frontiers in Microbiology (2017)
Transcriptional response of the harmful raphidophyte Heterosigma akashiwo to nitrate and phosphate stress, Haley, Sheean T.; Alexander, Harriet; Juhl, Andrew R.; T. Dyhrman, Sonya T. Harmful Algae (2017)
Peter Schlosser
Personal Information
Peter
Schlosser
Professor
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Geochemistry
Vinton Professor of Earth and Environmental Engineering
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Contact Information
139 Comer
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US

Fax: 

(845) 365-8176

Fields of interest: 

Aqueous Geochemistry, Physical Oceanography, Climate, Contaminant Transport.

My research focuses on the application of noble gases and other isotopes to natural systems with emphasis on the oceans and groundwater. My research is directed to understanding the natural state of these water bodies, the human perturbation of the natural state, and the possibility to design engineering solutions to the problems caused by human impact. The problems we are working on range from basic studies of circulation patterns of water in the ocean and groundwater flow systems to the variability of the oceanic circulation under natural and anthropogenically forced conditions or the transport and transformation of contaminants. Other projects include paleoclimate and paleocirculation studies.

For most of our studies, we use trace substances of natural or anthropogenic origin (isotopes or chemical compounds). In some cases we follow the penetration of such substances into the water bodies of interests in a fashion that is similar to dye experiments, but on a much larger scale. In other cases, we use combinations of isotopes as ?radioactive clocks? (e.g., tritium, the radioactive isotope of hydrogen, and its decay product, the noble gas isotope 3He). In some cases, we deliberately inject small amounts of inert trace gases into specific water bodies (e.g., the Hudson River) and study their spreading and mixing. Such experiments provide the closest analogues to the spreading of contaminants in the environment.

In many cases, we combine our experimental work with modeling studies to understand the underlying physics of the circulation or to explore predictability. Modeling studies also provide insight into management options for certain water bodies.

Some of my projects include:

 

Education
Ph.D.
Heidelberg
1985
Selected Publications:
Decrease of river runoff in the upper waters of the Eurasian Basin, Arctic Ocean, between 1991 and 1996: Evidence from delta O-18 data, Schlosser, P.; Newton, R.; Ekwurzel, B.; Khatiwala, S.; Mortlock, R.; Fairbanks, R. Geophysical Research Letters May 1, Volume: 29, Issue: 9 p.: - (2002) Doi 10.1029/2001gl013135
Determination of longitudinal dispersion coefficient and net advection in the tidal Hudson River with a large-scale, high resolution SF6 tracer release experiment, Ho, D. T.; Schlosser, P.; Caplow, T. Environmental Science & Technology Aug 1, Volume: 36, Issue: 15 p.: 3234-3241 (2002) UNSP ES015814+
Excess helium and neon in the southeast Pacific: Tracers for glacial meltwater, Hohmann, R.; Schlosser, P.; Jacobs, S.; Ludin, A.; Weppernig, R. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans Nov, Volume: 107, Issue: C11 p.: - (2002) Doi 10.1029/2000jc000378
William M. Smethie Jr.
Personal Information
William
M.
Smethie Jr.
Lamont Research Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Geochemistry
Associate Director - Geochemistry
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Contact Information
129 Comer
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8566

Fax: 

(845) 365-8176
Aleksey Kaplan
Personal Information
Alexey
Kaplan
Lamont Associate Research Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Ocean and Climate Physics
Contact Information
103C Oceanography
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8689

Fax: 

(845) 365-8157

Fields of interest: 

Analyses of climate fields based on historical, instrumental and paleoclimatic data; El Nino and Southern Oscillation; ocean data assimilation; statistical studies of climate variability from observations and models

I work in the Climate Modeling Group which is part of the LDEO Division of Ocean and Climate Physics. My research is on climate variability, predictability, and prediction, and on methods to study such things. It involves historical climate analyses, paleoclimatic reconstructions, data assimilation, and studies of error dynamics in the ocean and coupled climate models.

Education
Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering
Russian State University of Oil and Gas, Moscow, Russia
1990
B.S. (honors), Applied Mathematics
Russian State University of Oil and Gas, Moscow, Russia
1985