Geochemistry

The Geochemistry faculty study a wide range of processes and interactions, including products of large-scale Earth differentiation, such as the composition, evolution and age of the mantle and core, the formation and evolution of oceanic and continental crust, interactions between the geochemical environment (soil, water, air) and human health, fundamental questions involving the oceans and continental water systems, global geochemical cycles involving the atmosphere, oceans and Earth's interior, natural and engineered methods for carbon capture and storage, and using a wide range of geochemical archives to understand how and why the ocean and climate have changed at timescales ranging from seasons to millions of years. The faculty has developed strong collaborations with Columbia University engineers, biologists, public health researchers and American Museum of Natural History petrologists, planetary geologists and paleontologists.

Yingzhe Wu
Personal Information
Yingzhe
Wu
Postdoctoral Research Scientist
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Geochemistry
Contact Information
wu.jpg
433 Comer
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
Frank Pavia
Personal Information
Frank
Pavia
Graduate Student
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Geochemistry
Contact Information
427 Comer
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8572

Fax: 

(845) 365-8155

Fields of interest: 

Chemical Oceanography, Isotope Geochemistry, Marine Biogeochemistry, Paleoceanography
Education
M.A.
Columbia University
05/2016
B.A.
Columbia University
05/2014
Nicolas Young
Personal Information
Nicolas
Young
Lamont Assistant Research Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Geochemistry
Contact Information
205 Comer
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8653

Fax: 

(845) 365-8155

Fields of interest: 

Ice Sheets, glaciers, cosmogenic nuclides
Education
PhD - Geology
University at Buffalo
05/2012
MS - Geology
University at Buffalo
05/2008
BA - Geology
College of Wooster
05/2005
Maayan Yehudai
Personal Information
Maayan
Yehudai
Graduate Student
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Geochemistry
Contact Information
Maayan_Yehudai.jpg
419 Comer
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8328

Fax: 

(845) 365-8155

Fields of interest: 

Geochemistry, Paleoclimate, Oceanography

I am a geoscientist interested in climatic and environmental changes and am seeking to develop novel approaches for tracing past variations. During my master’s, I used U-series isotopes to date uplifted coral reefs, from the Gulf of Aqaba, that were extensively altered to calcite. I dated the time of coral alteration and the age of original deposition in order to reconstruct sea-level (Bar et al., 2018; Yehudai et al., 2017). For my PhD research I have been using the geochemistry of ocean sediments from the North Atlantic to reconstruct changes in Atlantic-Ocean circulation associated with climatic shifts. I have also studied sediments from the Great Bahama Bank to infer dust supply fluctuations in response to the formation of the Sahara Desert. 

Education
Masters
Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Israel
07/2014
Bachelor
Ben-Gurion University in the Negev, Israel
07/2010
Franziska Landes
Personal Information
Franziska
Landes
Graduate Student
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Geochemistry
Contact Information
417 Comer
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8652

Fax: 

(845) 365-8155

Fields of interest: 

Environmental geochemistry, environmental health, soil science, community-based participatory research, citizen science, environmental education

Franziska Landes is a Ph.D. candidate in the Earth and Environmental Science program at Columbia University. She is interested in environmental geochemistry and public health, especially the potential for community and public participation in science to reduce exposure to environmental contaminants while increasing environmental literacy. Her current work involves developing a field test kit for lead in soils and working with communities to discover the extent of soil-lead contamination in New York City and Peru.

After receiving her B.Sc. from Jacobs University in Germany, she worked for two years at the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, conducting and reviewing environmental assessments and remediation plans for the Brownfields Program.

Education
M.Phil. in Earth and Environmental Sciences
Columbia University
10/2017
M.A. in Earth and Environmental Sciences
Columbia University
05/2015
B.Sc. Earth and Space Science
Jacobs University, Bremen, Germany
06/2011
Selected Publications:
Cadmium and Uranium in German and Brazilian Phosphorous Fertilizers, Smidt, G.A.; Landes, F.C.; Carvalho, L.M.; Koschinsky, A.; Schnug, E. The New Uranium Mining Boom, Berlin p.: 167-174 (2012)
Kassandra Costa
Personal Information
Kassandra
Costa
Graduate Student
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Geochemistry
Contact Information
107 Comer
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8454

Fax: 

(845) 365-8155

Fields of interest: 

Isotope geochemistry, paleoclimatology, paleoceanography, marine biogeochemistry

My research interests involve the application of major elements, trace elements and isotopes to investigate the interface between climate, biogeochemistry, and the environment. I am particularly interested in the tropics, and my recent projects have included stable isotope (dD) geochemistry in Ethiopia, redox (Fe, Cr, U) variability in Indonesia, and productivity and dust (231Pa/230Th, 232Th, d15N) fluctuations in the Central Equatorial Pacific. In my upcoming work, I will investigate the relationship between volcanism and global climate change at orbital timescales by tracking changes in hydrothermal vent activity as recorded in marine sediment cores from the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

Education
Sc. B.
Brown University
05/2012
Selected Publications:
Isotopic reconstruction of the African Humid Period and Congo Air Boundary migration at Lake Tana, Ethiopia, Costa, K.; Russell, J.; Konecky, B.; Lamb, H. Quaternary Science Reviews, Volume: 83 p.: 58-67 (2014)
Glacial forcing of central Indonesian hydroclimate since 60,000 yr B.P, Russell, J.M.; Vogel, H.; Konecky, B.L.; Bijaksana, S.; Huang, Y.; Melles, M.; Wattrus, N.; Costa, K.; King, J.W. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science p.: 2-7 (2014)
Hydrological connectivity and mixing of Lake Towuti, Indonesia in response to paleoclimatic changes over the last 60,000 years, Costa, K.; Russell, J.; Vogel, H.; Bijaksana, S. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2014)
Daniel Rasmussen
Personal Information
Daniel
Rasmussen
Graduate Student
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Geochemistry
Contact Information
107 Comer
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8454

Fax: 

(845) 365-8155

Fields of interest: 

Volcanology, Igneous Petrology, Geochemistry

I have broad interests in the fields of volcanism, magmatism, and tectonics. My work in these fields covers several topics that largely fit into two areas. First, I examine the P-T-X-t path of magmas prior to eruption, which I approach using solubility barometers, crystal-melt thermometers, and diffusion chronometers. Second, I investigate the origin and role of volatiles in magmatic systems. My favorite tool is melt inclusions, which provide a unique means for directly measuring the pre-eruptive volatile contents of mama. Central to my work is the chemical and textural analysis of macrocrysts, at both the individual crystal and population scales, and integrating my results with those of other disciplines (e.g., seismology, remote sensing).

Education
M. Phil. in Earth Science
Columbia University
2018
M.S. in Geology
New Mexico Tech
2014
B.S. with Honors in Geological Sciences
University of Oregon
2012
Galen McKinley
Personal Information
Galen
McKinley
Professor
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Geochemistry
Contact Information
429 Comer
61 Route 9 W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8585

Fax: 

(845) 365-8155

Fields of interest: 

carbon cycle, marine biogeochemistry, ocean circulation

Professor McKinley studies the mechanisms of the carbon cycle in the global oceans and Great Lakes, with her research lying at the intersection of physical and chemical oceanography. Her primary tools are numerical models and analysis of large datasets. More specifically, her research addresses the physical drivers of ecosystem and carbon cycle variability in the North Atlantic, global oceans and Great Lakes. Professor McKinley is a member of the faculty at Columbia University and the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory; she was previously at University of Wisconsin – Madison. In addition to research and teaching, Professor McKinley frequently contributes to national and international scientific coordination and offers scientific advice to policy-makers.

Education
PhD
MIT
2002
BS
Rice University
1995
Sebastian Vivancos
Personal Information
Sebastian
M.
Vivancos
Graduate Student
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Geochemistry
Contact Information
423 Comer
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8793

Fax: 

(845) 365-8155

Fields of interest: 

Chemical Oceanography, Isotope Geochemistry, Marine Biogeochemistry, Paleoclimatology
Education
M.Phil. Earth and Environmental Sciences
Columbia University
2018
M.A. Earth and Environmental Sciences
Columbia University
2016
B.A. Earth Science and Chemistry
Columbia University
2013
Selected Publications:
Intense hydrothermal scavenging of 230Th and 231Pa in the deep Southeast Pacific, Pavia, Frank J.; Anderson, Robert F.; Vivancos, Sebastian M.; Fleisher, Martin Q.; Lam, Phoebe J.; Lu, Yanbin; Cheng, Hai; Zhang, Pu; Edwards, R. Lawrence Marine Chemistry, Volume: 201 p.: 212–228 (2018) doi:10.1016/j.marchem.2017.08.003
Intensity of Th and Pa scavenging partitioned by particle chemistry in the North Atlantic Ocean, Hayes, Christopher T.; Anderson, Robert F.; Fleisher, Martin Q.; Vivancos, Sebastian M.; Lam, Phoebe J.; Ohnemus, Daniel C.; Huang, Kuo-Fang; Robinson, Laura F.; Lu, Yanbin; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Moran, S. Bradley Marine Chemistry, Volume: 170 p.: 49–60 (2015) doi:10.1016/j.marchem.2015.01.006

Pages