Geology-Paleontology

The Geology/Paleontology faculty are exploring processes recorded in the rock record, including sedimentary, structural, igneous, marine, planetary and glacial geology; paleontology and geobiology. Research is process-oriented and interdisciplinary, with a strong field component. Active areas of research include faulting and crustal deformation within the lithopshere and along tectonic plate boundaries, the sedimentary record of climate and sea-level change, tectonic drivers of magmatism, volcanic systems, the evolution of the crust and mantle in the context of seafloor spreading, subduction zone processes, arc magmatism and ocean island volcanoes, glacial and landslide geomorphology, the structure and evolution of deeply exhumed rocks, and the evolution of life. Many of these topics include both terrestrial and marine approaches. The faculty has developed strong collaborations with scientists at the American Museum of Natural History.

NICHOLAS CHRISTIE-BLICK
Personal Information
Nicholas
Christie-Blick
Professor
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Seismology Geology and Tectonophysics
Contact Information
215A Seismology
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8180

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150

Fields of interest: 

Sedimentary Geology and Tectonics

Early Years

My introduction to the world of geology began as little more than a passing fancy and a love of the great outdoors. When I showed up at the University of Cambridge in 1971 it was with every intention of studying physics. A spring field trip to the Scottish island of Arran soon led to a re-evaluation of priorities, but for largely visceral reasons rather than through any appreciation for the societal relevance of Earth science or whether I might be able to make a living as a geologist. A single job interview, with Consolidated Goldfields towards the end of 1973, and during my final year at Cambridge, went badly. I miscalculated how long it would take to ride “the tube” (subway) from the Chinese Exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts to the company’s London office, and I do not think that I displayed much enthusiasm for moving to South Africa or for working underground.

My decision a couple of months later to undertake a Ph.D. on Proterozoic glaciation was equally fateful – a byproduct of weekly “supervisions” (one on one discussions) with Brian Harland at Caius College, two conferences that I attended as an undergraduate, Dan McKenzie’s glowing endorsement of U.S. science over tea at Madingly Rise, an enthusiastic letter from John Crowell offering admission and a teaching assistantship at the University of California, Santa Barbara (my #1 choice), and the unexpected end of a personal relationship that might have provided a rationale for remaining in the U.K.

The Neoproterozoic Era proved to be a fertile research target – for its climatic extremes, as a threshold in the history of life, and for concomitant changes in sea level and the chemistry of the oceans and atmosphere. My research with students and collaborators over the years has touched on many aspects of this geology: its stratigraphy and sedimentology, paleobiology, paleomagnetics and isotope geochemistry, and in Australia, India and China as well as the western U.S., where I undertook my Ph.D. project.

My broader interests in sedimentary geology and tectonics were stimulated by three years with Exxon in the early 1980s. Exxon was then at the center of a conceptual revolution, in which it was recognized that the best way to study sediments is with reference to their three-dimensional stratal geometry and the manner in which they accumulate layer by layer (sequence stratigraphy). This experience led to a second very fruitful research effort, in a range of geological settings, and with a focus on how sedimentation responds to a combination of sea-level change, deformation and other phenomena.

A third area of research, in extensional tectonics, also has its roots in geological mapping in the Cordilleran orogen and Basin and Range Province undertaken as part of my Ph.D. study. However, I credit a late-night conversation with my colleague, Mark Anders in 1992 for an intellectual journey that we have taken together on the paradox of low-angle normal faulting.

Opportunities

Opportunities are available at Columbia for students to learn about and to undertake projects in these and other aspects of sedimentary geology and tectonics. Current research is aimed at such varied topics as how sedimentation responds to sea-level change, deformation and other phenomena; mechanisms of crustal extension, with particular reference to the low-angle normal fault paradox; and the geology of the Neoproterozoic Era.

U/Pb-40Ar/39Ar Coupling Approach for the Reconstruction of Paleo-River Systems: A Case Study of the Siluro-Devonian Old Red Sandstone of Scotland (PRF #54919-ND8, 2015-2017). – The project involves a geochronological test of the idea that the Old Red Sandstone represents the deposits of a regional-scale river system draining the Caledonides of Greenland and Norway, comparable to the way in which the Indus and Ganges rivers drain the Himalaya today. We are interested also in the related issue of how basins developed through a combination of strike slip, extension and orogen-parallel crustal shortening. The project is being spear-headed by Michael J. DeLuca as part of his Ph.D. research.

Testing the Extensional Detachment Paradigm: A Borehole Observatory in the Sevier Desert Basin. – I am lead proponent for an International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) initiative to test the extensional detachment paradigm in the Sevier Desert basin, Utah. A priority in 2017 is to seek funds to acquire geophysical data to evaluate the character of the sub-Tertiary contact, and to provide 3–D context for a coring project at the ARCO Hole-in-Rock #1 well.

We continue to work at several other locations in the Basin and Range Province: the Death Valley region of eastern California; adjacent parts of Nevada, Arizona and Utah; and southeastern Idaho

Stratigraphic Response to Deformation and Sea-Level Change in the Gulf of Suez, Egypt. – The Gulf of Suez, Egypt provides a unique opportunity for evaluating how sedimentation responds to crustal deformation and sea-level change in a setting in which both are known to have been important. A project currently being developed in collaboration with Dr Ahmed El-Barkooky at the University of Cairo will involve physical stratigraphic and structural mapping, sedimentology, high-resolution Sr isotopic dating, biostratigraphy, and cyclostratigraphy to investigate how patterns of sedimentation and erosion relate to the propagation of faults and folds, the tilting of fault blocks, and independently quantified sea-level change during the early Miocene. Options are being explored for co-ordinating outcrop studies with a subsurface project

I have learned over the years that a good way to frame any research is to challenge conventional thinking, and to focus upon topics on which there is lively disagreement, because the goal of any project is surely to discover something new and not merely to describe another example of an already well understood phenomenon. Potential students are invited to place their email inquiries in the context of one or more general issues or hypotheses or questions of this kind, and the strategies that might be employed to tackle whatever they suggest.

Google Scholar profile: http://scholar.google.com/citations?hl=en&user=vD6gJnEAAAAJ

Education
Ph.D. (Geology)
University of California, Santa Barbara
1979
B.A. (Natural Sciences/Geology)
University of Cambridge (King's College), UK
1974
A complete list of former students is included in my CV, which may be downloaded at: http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/~ncb/
Selected Publications:
Tectonically controlled nearshore deposition: Cozzette Sandstone, Book Cliffs, Colorado, U.S.A., Madof, A.S.; Christie-Blick, N.; Anders, M.H. Journal of Sedimentary Research 05/2015, Volume: 85 p.: 459-488 (2015) http://dx.doi.org/10.2110/jsr.2015.26
Cominco American Well: Implications for the Reconstruction of the Sevier Orogen and Basin and Range Extension in West-Central Utah, Anders, M.H.; Christie-Blick, N.; Malinverno, A. American Journal of Science 05/2012, Volume: 312 p.: 508-533 (2012) 10.2475/05.2012.02
Condensation origin for Neoproterozoic cap carbonates during deglaciation, Kennedy, M.J.; and Christie-Blick, N. Condensation origin for Neoproterozoic cap carbonates during deglaciation 04/2011, Volume: 39 p.: 319-322 (2011)
Testing the extensional detachment paradigm: A borehole observatory in the Sevier Desert basin, Christie-Blick, N.; Anders, M.H.; Manatschal, G.; Wernicke, B.P. Scientific Drilling, Issue: No. 8 p.: 57-59 (2009)
Stratigraphic controls on a salt-withdrawal intraslope minibasin, north-central Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico: Implications for misinterpreting sea level change, Madof, A.S.; Christie-Blick, N.; Anders, M.H. American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, Volume: 93 p.: 535-561 (2009)
Re-evaluation of the middle Miocene Eagle Mountain Formation and its significance as a piercing point for the interpretation of extreme extension across the Death Valley region, California, U.S.A., Renik, B.; Christie-Blick, N.; Troxel, B. W.; Wright, L. A.; Niemi, N. A. Journal of Sedimentary Research Mar-Apr, Volume: 78, Issue: 3-4 p.: 199-219 (2008) Doi 10.2110/Jsr.2008.022
Resolving apparent conflicts between oceanographic and Antarctic climate records and evidence for a decrease in pCO(2) during the Oligocene through early Miocene (34-16 Ma), Pekar, S. F.; Christie-Blick, N. Palaeogeography Palaeoclimatology Palaeoecology Apr 7, Volume: 260, Issue: 1-2 p.: 41-49 (2008) DOI 10.1016/j.palaeo.2007.08.019
Is there a role for sequence stratigraphy in chronostratigraphy?, Christie-Blick, N.; Pekar, S. F.; Madof, A. S. Stratigraphy, Volume: 4, Issue: 2-3 p.: 217-229 (2007)
Observations from the Basin and Range Province (western United States) pertinent to the interpretation of regional detachment faults, Christie-Blick, N.; Anders, M.H.; Wills, S.; Walker, C.D.; Renik, B. Imaging, Mapping and Modelling Continental Lithosphere Extension and Breakup: Geological Society of London, Special Publication 282 p.: 419-439 (2007)
The phanerozoic record of global sea-level change, Miller, K. G.; Kominz, M. A.; Browning, J. V.; Wright, J. D.; Mountain, G. S.; Katz, M. E.; Sugarman, P. J.; Cramer, B. S.; Christie-Blick, N.; Pekar, S. F. Science Nov 25, Volume: 310, Issue: 5752 p.: 1293-1298 (2005) DOI 10.1126/science.1116412
Stable isotopic evidence for methane seeps in Neoproterozoic postglacial cap carbonates, Jiang, G. Q.; Kennedy, M. J.; Christie-Blick, N. Nature 12/2003, Volume: 426, Issue: 6968 p.: 822-826 (2003) Doi 10.1038/Nature02201
Are Proterozoic cap carbonates and isotopic excursions a record of gas hydrate destabilization following Earth's coldest intervals?, Kennedy, M. J.; Christie-Blick, N.; Sohl, L. E. Geology May, Volume: 29 p.: 443-446 (2001)
Sequence Stratigraphy and the Interpretation of Neoproterozoic Earth History, Christie-Blick, N.; Dyson, I. A.; Vonderborch, C. C. Precambrian Research May, Volume: 73, Issue: 1-4 p.: 3-26 (1995)
Onlap, Offlap, and the Origin of Unconformity-Bounded Depositional Sequences, Christie-Blick, N. Marine Geology Mar, Volume: 97, Issue: 1-2 p.: 35-56 (1991)
Deformation and basin formation along strike-slip faults, Christie-Blick, N.; Biddle, K.T. Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists Special Publication, Volume: 37 p.: 1-34 (1985)
Julia Tejada Lara
Personal Information
Julia
Tejada Lara
Contact Information
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
Sean Kinney
Personal Information
Sean
Kinney
Graduate Student
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information
206F Geoscience
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(570) 510-2600

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150
James D. Webster
Personal Information
James
D.
Webster
American Museum of Natural History
Adjunct Research Scientist
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information
Dept. of Earth & Planetary Science
Central Park West at 79th Street
New York
NY
10024-5192
US
(212) 769-5401
Timothy Creyts
Personal Information
Timothy
Creyts
Lamont Assistant Research Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Marine Geology and Geophysics
Contact Information
208B Oceanography
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8368

Fax: 

(845) 365-8156
Einat Lev
Personal Information
Einat
Lev
Lamont Assistant Research Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Seismology Geology and Tectonophysics
Contact Information
108L Seismology
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8616

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150

Fields of interest: 

Physical volcanology, lava flow, numerical modeling, analog experiments, natural hazards, volcanic eruptions, magma, fluid mechanics, UAVs, photogrammetry, aerial photography, planetary volcanism
Education
PhD
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
6/2009
BSc
Tel-Aviv University
7/2000
Selected Publications:
Shallow and deep controls on lava lake surface motion at K\={\i}lauea Volcano, Patrick, Matt ; Orr, Tim ; Swanson, Don ; Lev, Einat Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research (2016) 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2016.11.010
Gas pistoning and episodic outgassing in the lava lake at Halema'uma'u Crater, Kilauea Volcano, during 2010–2014, Patrick, Matt ; Orr, Tim ; Sutton, Jeff ; Lev, Einat ; Thelen, Wes; Fee, David Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Volume: 433 (2015) 10.1016/j.epsl.2015.10.052
Diverting lava flows in the laboratory, Dietterich, Hannah ; Cashman, Kathy ; Rust, Alison ; Lev, Einat Nature Geoscience, Volume: 8 (2015) 10.1038/ngeo2470
The Influence of Cross-sectional Channel Geometry on Rheology and Flux Estimates for Active Lava Flows, Lev, Einat ; James; Michael Bulletin of Volcanology, Volume: 76 (2014) 10.1007/s00445-014-0829-3
Experimental Insights on Natural Lava-Ice/Snow Interactions, Edwards, B. ; Karson, J. ; Wysocki, R. ; Lev, E. Geology, Volume: 41 p.: 851-854 (2013) 10.1130/G34305.1
Investigating lava flow rheology using video analysis and numerical flow models, Lev, E. ; Spiegelman, M. ; Karson, J. ; Wysocki, R. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, Volume: 247-248 p.: 62-73 (2012) 0.1016/j.jvolgeores.2012.08.002
Colin P. Stark
Personal Information
Colin
P.
Stark
Lamont Associate Research Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Marine Geology and Geophysics
Contact Information
305A Oceanography
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8742

Fax: 

(845) 365-8156

Fields of interest: 

Geomorphology, tectonics, sedimentology, hydrology, tropical meteorology

If I had to summarize my research interests in one succinct phrase, it would be "the physics of geomorphology".  I'm fascinated by the processes that drive the evolution of landscapes on Earth, not to mention on other planets and moons. 

Over the past twenty years or so we've seen a renaissance in the field of geomorphology as a wealth of digital data has become available, particularly with advent of ubiquitous satellite remote sensing and digital elevation model mapping, along with burgeoning computational capabilities.  There has been explosion of activity in surface process research just as public concern over the environment has come to the fore in the political arena.  Never before has the study of the "skin of the earth" been so dynamic or so relevant to society.

My main research foci are landslides and mountain rivers, and I blend field observations, data analysis (GIS/RS) and theoretical efforts to the task of understanding them better.   I've focused over recent years on Taiwan and Japan as field areas, in part because of the intimate link between river erosion and landsliding that underpins their mountain landscape dynamics, and in part because the rate at which these landscapes evolve is so high and the year-on-year changes are so marked.

I'm currently working on four projects:

  • looking for climatic fingerprints in the morphology of bedrock rivers, especially incised meander channels, by establishing linkages with typhoon rainfall, floods and rock strength - the broader aim is to deepen our quantitative understanding of bedrock river erosion and morphodynamics (NSF-EAR funding; collaboration with several colleagues in Taiwan, Japan and the UK)
  • researching ways to better express the multi-scale heterogeneity of geomorphic processes in the equations we use to model them - in particular, we are developing methods of fractional calculus to encapsulate better properties of non-locality, scaling, and broad-tailed probability distributions that are so common in natural environments (NSF-EAR/CMG/HYD funding; collaboration with a hydrologist, Efi Foufoula-Georgiou, U. Minn. SAFL/NCED, and a mathematician/statistician, Mark Meerschaert, U. Michigan)
  • tackling landslide processes on several fronts, both from a stochastic perspective (magnitude-frequency distributions of landslide areas and volumes of mobilized debris) and a continuum-mechanical perspective (supercomputing simulation of elastoplastic failure using CIG code SNAC)  (recent NASA/NSF funding; collaborations with Fausto Guzzetti, CNR-IRPI Perugia, and Eunseo Choi, LDEO)
  • participating in a large multi-disciplinary project on the geodynamics of the Calabrian Arc ("Calarco"), where my focus is on reconstructing the late Quaternary history of coastal landscape evolution of the Calabrian peninsula using, for example, IRSL (OSL) dating of Gilbert fan deltas and marine terraces (NSF-CD funding; collaboration with many colleagues, in particular Thomas Dewez, BRGM, Sebastien Huot, UQAM, and Nano Seeber, LDEO)
Education
PhD
University of Leeds
1992
MA
University of Cambridge
1988
David Walker
Personal Information
David
Walker
Higgins Professor
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Geochemistry
Contact Information
113 Comer
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8658

Fax: 

(845) 365-8155

Fields of interest: 

Experimental Petrology

Examination of the chemical and physical evolution of the terrestrial planets by the methods of experimental petrology. Parallel interest in the development of new experimental techniques and new materials.

Education
AB
Oberlin
1968
AM
Harvard
1970
Ph.D.
Harvard
1972
Selected Publications:
Partitioning of molybdenum to 60 kbar along a warped Fe-FeS liquidus, Walker, D.; Li, J. Chemical Geology Feb 28, Volume: 248, Issue: 3-4 p.: 166-173 (2008) DOI 10.1016/j.chemgeo.2007.04.006
Galena stability to 26 kbar, Wheeler, K. T.; Walker, D.; Johnson, M. C. American Journal of Science Mar, Volume: 307, Issue: 3 p.: 590-611 (2007) Doi 10.2475/03.2007.02
Constraints on core formation from Pt partitioning in mafic silicate liquids at high temperatures, Cottrell, E.; Walker, D. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta Mar 15, Volume: 70, Issue: 6 p.: 1565-1580 (2006) DOI 10.1016/j.gca.2005.11.021
Core/mantle-like interactions in an electric field, Kavner, A.; Walker, D. Earth and Planetary Science Letters Aug 15, Volume: 248, Issue: 1-2 p.: 316-329 (2006) DOI 10.1016/j.epsl.2006.05.033
Experimental partitioning of uranium between liquid iron sulfide and liquid silicate: Implications for radioactivity in the Earth's core, Wheeler, K. T.; Walker, D.; Fei, Y. W.; Minarik, W. G.; McDonough, W. F. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta Mar 15, Volume: 70, Issue: 6 p.: 1537-1547 (2006) DOI 10.1016/j.gca.2005.11.023
Core-mantle chemical issues, Walker, D. Canadian Mineralogist Oct, Volume: 43 p.: 1553-1564 (2005)
Halite-sylvite thermoconsolution, Walker, D.; Verma, P. K.; Cranswick, L. M. D.; Clark, S. M.; Jones, R. L.; Buhre, S. American Mineralogist Jan, Volume: 90, Issue: 1 p.: 229-239 (2005)
Experimental partitioning of Tc, Mo, Ru, and Re between solid and liquid during crystallization in Fe-Ni-S, Lazar, C.; Walker, D.; Walker, R. J. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta Feb, Volume: 68, Issue: 3 p.: 643-651 (2004)
Halite-sylvite thermoelasticity, Walker, D.; Verma, P. K.; Cranswick, L. M. D.; Jones, R. L.; Clark, S. M.; Buhre, S. American Mineralogist Jan, Volume: 89, Issue: 1 p.: 204-210 (2004)
Thermal equations of state for B1 and B2 KCl, Walker, D.; Cranswick, L. M. D.; Verma, P. K.; Clark, S. M.; Buhre, S. American Mineralogist Jul, Volume: 87, Issue: 7 p.: 805-812 (2002)
Synthesis and thermal decomposition of tetragonal RbClO4 and volume of fluid O-2 from 2 to 9 GPa, Walker, D.; Hughes, G.; Cranswick, L. M. D.; Clark, S. M.; Buhre, S. Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems Oct 11, Volume: 2 p.: art. no.-2001GC000154 (2001)
Core participation in mantle geochemistry: Geochemical Society Ingerson Lecture, GSA Denver, October 1999, Walker, D. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta Sep, Volume: 64, Issue: 17 p.: 2897-2911 (2000)
Rapid methods for the calibration of solid-state detectors, Walker, D.; Clark, S. M.; Jones, R. L.; Cranswick, L. M. D. Journal of Synchrotron Radiation Jan 1, Volume: 7 p.: 18-21 (2000)
Sidney R. Hemming
Personal Information
Sidney
R.
Hemming
Professor
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Geochemistry
Contact Information
413 Comer
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8417

Fax: 

(845) 365-8155

Fields of interest: 

geochronology, sedimentary geochemistry, paleoclimate, continental crust evolution

I consider my field to be Historical Geology. Using the record from sediments and sedimentary rocks, I seek to document aspects of Earth's history. Understanding the provenance and processes recorded in the geochemistry of sediments and sedimentary rocks lies at the heart of my research interests. I have strong interest in tectonics and continental crust evolution questions on the longer time scale. I have an active program of applying radiogenic isotopes for tracing the sources of sediments with the goal of understanding Quaternary climate changes and associated changes in winds, currents and glaciers. Provenance studies of ice rafted detritus are key to working out the dynamic relationships among paleo-climate and paleo-ocean circulation and their interactions with the large ice sheets that covered the northern continents during the ice ages. Geochronology is essential to my research and I am actively participating in projects to improve our ability to obtain reliable age estimates on events in Earth's history.

  • Ar Geochronology Lab
Education
Ph.D.
SUNY Stony Brook
1994
Master of Science
Tulane
1986
Bachelor of Science
Midwestern
1983
Marissa Tremblay, Barnard College Senior
Selected Publications:
Characterizing the sediment provenance of East Antarctica's weak underbelly: The Aurora and Wilkes sub-glacial basins, Pierce, Pierce, E.L.; Williams T.; van de Flierdt, T.; Hemming, S.R.; Goldstein, S.L.; Brachfeld, S.A. Paleoceanography, Volume: 26, Issue: PA4217 p.: 10.1029/2011PA002127 (2011)
Evidence for iceberg armadas from East Antarctica in the Southern Ocean during the late Miocene and early Pliocene, Williams, T; van de Flierdt, T; Hemming, SR; Chung, E; Roy, M; Goldstein, SL Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Volume: 290 p.: 351-361 (2010)
Contrasting compositions of Saharan dust in the eastern Atlantic Ocean during the last deglaciation and African Humid Period, Cole, J. M.; Goldstein, S. L.; deMenocal, P. B.; Hemming, S. R.; Grousset, F. E. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Volume: 278, Issue: 3-4 p.: 257-266 (2009) doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2008.12.011
Use of strontium isotopes in detrital sediments to constrain the glacial position of the Agulhas Retroflection, Franzese, A. M.; Hemming, S. R.; Goldstein, S. L. Paleoceanography, Volume: 24 (2009) 10.1029/2008PA001706
Spectral analysis of the lower Eocene Wilkins Peak Member, Green River Formation, Wyoming: Support for Milankovitch cyclicity, Machlus, M. L.; Olsen, P. E.; Christie-Blick, N.; Hemming, S. R. Earth and Planetary Science Letters Apr 15, Volume: 268, Issue: 1-2 p.: 64-75 (2008) DOI 10.1016/j.epsl.2007.12.024
Modeling the marine nd isotope variability with an offline ocean general circulation model, Jones, K. M.; Khatiwala, S.; Goldstein, S. L.; Hemming, S. R.; van de Flierdt, T. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta Jul, Volume: 72, Issue: 12 p.: A439-A439 (2008)
Ar-40/Ar-39 ages of hornblende grains and bulk Sm/Nd isotopes of circum-Antarctic glacio-marine sediments: Implications for sediment provenance in the Southern Ocean, Roy, M.; van de Flierdt, T. V.; Hemming, S. R.; Goldstein, S. L. Chemical Geology Oct 15, Volume: 244, Issue: 3-4 p.: 507-519 (2007) DOI 10.1016/j.chemgeo.2007.07.017
Heinrich events: Massive late pleistocene detritus layers of the North Atlantic and their global climate imprint, Hemming, S. R. Reviews of Geophysics Mar 18, Volume: 42, Issue: 1 p.: - (2004) Doi 10.1029/2003rg000128
Radiogenic isotopes as tracers of sediment provenance and flux: Paleoceanography of the South Atlantic, Franzese, A. M.; Hemming, S. R.; Goldstein, S. L.; Anderson, R. F.; Broecker, W. S. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta Sep, Volume: 67, Issue: 18 p.: A102-A102 (2003)
Ar-40/Ar-39 ages and Ar-40* concentrations of fine-grained sediment fractions from North Atlantic Heinrich layers, Hemming, S. R.; Hall, C. M.; Biscaye, P. E.; Higgins, S. M.; Bond, G. C.; McManus, J. F.; Barber, D. C.; Andrews, J. T.; Broecker, W. S. Chemical Geology Feb 15, Volume: 182, Issue: 2-4 p.: 583-603 (2002) Pii S0009-2541(01)00342-4
Laschamp excursion at Mono Lake?, Kent, D. V.; Hemming, S. R.; Turrin, B. D. Earth and Planetary Science Letters Apr 15, Volume: 197, Issue: 3-4 p.: 151-164 (2002) Pii S0012-821x(02)00474-0
Paleoclimate - Climate swings come into focus, Broecker, W. S.; Hemming, S. Science Dec 14, Volume: 294, Issue: 5550 p.: 2308-2309 (2001)