Biogeoscience

Members of the new Biogeoscience group investigate living systems as fundamental components of the Earth System and possibly other planetary systems through the integrated study of biology, geochemistry, and geology. In DEES, students have the opportunity to work with faculty in aquatic, wetland and terrestrial ecology, biological oceanography, evolutionary biology, microbial genomics, biogeochemistry, paleobiology and astrobiology. DEES Biogeosciences faculty conduct research on biodiversity and ecosystem function, ecological responses to climate change, biogeochemical cycling and storage of nutrients and carbon, plant physiology and biooptics (both aquatic and terrestrial), and the application of isotopic, fossil and organic geochemical tracers to the study of climate and Earth history. Fieldwork and lab experiments employ diverse analytical, observational and modeling tools to build understanding of the Biosphere and its interactions within the Earth System, in the past, present and future.

Neil Pederson
Personal Information
Neil
Pederson
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information

Fields of interest: 

Terrestrial Ecosystems, Dendrochronology, Dendroclimatology, Forest Ecosystems, Disturbance Ecology
Education
Ph.D.
Columbia University
08/2005
MS
Auburn University
08/1994
BS
State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry
12/1990
AS
State University of New York Morrisville Ag & Tech
05/1988
Selected Publications:
Temperature and precipitation in Mongolia based on dendroclimatic investigations, Jacoby, G.; Pederson, N.; D'Arrigo, R. Chinese Science Bulletin Jul, Volume: 48, Issue: 14 p.: 1474-1479 (2003) Doi 10.1360/02wd0390
1738 years of Mongolian temperature variability inferred from a tree-ring width chronology of Siberian pine, D'Arrigo, R.; Jacoby, G.; Frank, D.; Pederson, N.; Cook, E.; Buckley, B.; Nachin, B.; Mijiddorj, R.; Dugarjav, C. Geophysical Research Letters Feb 1, Volume: 28, Issue: 3 p.: 543-546 (2001)
Hydrometeorological reconstructions for northeastern Mongolia derived from tree rings: 1651-1995, Pederson, N.; Jacoby, G. C.; D'Arrigo, R. D.; Cook, E. R.; Buckley, B. M.; Dugarjav, C.; Mijiddorj, R. Journal of Climate, Volume: 14, Issue: 5 p.: 872-881 (2001)
Monogolian tree-rings, temperature sensitivity and reconstructions of Northern Hemisphere temperature, D'Arrigo, R.; Jacoby, G.; Pederson, N.; Frank, D.; Buckley, B.; Nachin, B.; Mijiddorj, R.; Dugarjav, C. Holocene Nov, Volume: 10, Issue: 6 p.: 669-672 (2000)
Temperature and precipitation in Mongolia based on dendroclimatic investigations, Jacoby, G.; D'Arrigo, R.; Pederson, N.; Buckley, B.; Dugarjav, C.; Mijiddorj, R. Iawa Journal, Volume: 20, Issue: 3 p.: 339-350 (1999)
Kevin L. Griffin
Personal Information
Kevin
L.
Griffin
Professor
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information
6 Marine Biology
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8371

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150

Fields of interest: 

Plant respiration; global carbon cycle; forest ecology

After more than 150 million years of isolation the podocarps that dominate the forests of the west coast of the south island of New Zealand have remarkably slow growth rates by comparison to most other forest tree species. The question is, why? In New York, the aging eastern deciduous forests continue to rapidly accumulate carbon. Could this be the result of the high levels of atmospheric N deposition this area receives? When plants are grown in elevated CO2 photosynthesis is stimulated initially but often this enhancement does not last and given time, a strong acclimation to the new growth environment can occur. Is there a reason why some plants acclimate to CO2 and others do not? Plant respiration is often thought of as the processes by which plants loose carbon during the night. How then can we estimate the contribution of respiration to the carbon balance of arctic plants which never experience night during the growing season? Plant cells from leaves of plants grown in elevated CO2 tend to have twice the number of mitochondria and chloroplast as cells from plants grown in ambient CO2. Is there a link between this structural observation and physiological function?

These are a few examples of the type of research questions my lab is currently working on. The objective of this research is to explain processes in plant and ecosystem ecology in terms of the physiological, biochemical and biophysical processes involved. Ultimately we hope to increase our understanding of both the role of the Earth's vegetation in the global carbon cycle and the interactions between the carbon cycle and the Earth's climate system.

Some of my projects include:

  • Environmental Controls on Tree Growth: A Comparison between the Cascade Brook Watershed of Black Rock Forest, NY and a Native New Zealand Forest.
  • Effects of developmental changes on the physiological processes that regulate photosynthetic responses to climate change.
  • Land-Water Interactions at the Catchment Scale: Linking Biogeochemistry and Hydrology.
Education
Ph.D.
Duke
1994
M.E.S.
Yale
1987
Bachelor of Arts
Whittier
1985
Selected Publications:
Leaf respiration is differentially affected by leaf vs. stand-level night-time warming, Griffin, K. L.; Turnbull, M.; Murthy, R.; Lin, G. H.; Adams, J.; Farnsworth, B.; Mahato, T.; Bazin, G.; Potasnak, M.; Berry, J. A. Global Change Biology May, Volume: 8, Issue: 5 p.: 479-485 (2002)
Canopy position affects the temperature response of leaf respiration in Populus deltoides, Griffin, K. L.; Turnbull, M.; Murthy, R. New Phytologist Jun, Volume: 154, Issue: 3 p.: 609-619 (2002)
Leaf dark respiration as a function of canopy position in Nothofagus fusca trees grown at ambient and elevatedCO(2) partial pressures for 5 years, Griffin, K. L.; Tissue, D. T.; Turnbull, M. H.; Schuster, W.; Whitehead, D. Functional Ecology Aug, Volume: 15, Issue: 4 p.: 497-505 (2001)
Peter M. Eisenberger
Personal Information
Peter
M.
Eisenberger
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information
110 Geoscience
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
Education
Ph.D.
Harvard
1967
Bachelor of Science
Princeton
1963

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