Biogeoscience

Members of the new Biogeoscience group investigate living systems as fundamental components of the Earth System and possibly other planetary systems through the integrated study of biology, geochemistry, and geology. In DEES, students have the opportunity to work with faculty in aquatic, wetland and terrestrial ecology, biological oceanography, evolutionary biology, microbial genomics, biogeochemistry, paleobiology and astrobiology. DEES Biogeosciences faculty conduct research on biodiversity and ecosystem function, ecological responses to climate change, biogeochemical cycling and storage of nutrients and carbon, plant physiology and biooptics (both aquatic and terrestrial), and the application of isotopic, fossil and organic geochemical tracers to the study of climate and Earth history. Fieldwork and lab experiments employ diverse analytical, observational and modeling tools to build understanding of the Biosphere and its interactions within the Earth System, in the past, present and future.

William D'Andrea
Personal Information
William
D'Andrea
Lamont Associate Research Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information
205D Geoscience
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964
US
(845) 365-8654

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150

My research is geared toward understanding global climate change, including current anthropogenic driven changes and past changes to the Earth System.  I investigate the natural modes and underlying forcing mechanisms of past climate variability, with the goal of developing a better understanding of how the Earth System responds to natural and human-induced perturbations.

Education
PhD
Brown University
05/2008
MSc
Brown University
05/2005
BS/BA
Binghamton University
05/2002
Thesis committee member of Laura B. Levy (Dartmouth College)
Thesis committee member of David Vaillencourt (Northern Arizona University)
Selected Publications:
Biogeochemical evidence for hydrologic changes during the Holocene in a lake record from southeast Greenland, Balascio, N.L.; D'Andrea, W.J.; Bradley, R.S.; Perren, B.B. The Holocene, Volume: 23 p.: 1428-1439 (2013) 10.1177/0959683613493938
The influence of 14C reservoir age on interpretation of paleolimnological records from the Tibetan Plateau, Hou, J; D'Andrea, W.J.; Liu, Z. Quaternary Science Reviews 07/2012, Volume: 48 p.: 13 (2012)
Proxy-to-proxy calibration: Increasing the temporal resolution of quantitative climate reconstructions, von Gunten, L; D'Andrea, W.J.; Bradley, R.S.; Huang, Y. Scientific Reports 08/2012, Volume: 2, Issue: 609 p.: 6 (2012) 10.1038/srep00609
Mild Little Ice Age and unprecedented recent warmth in an 1800 year lake sediment record from Svalbard, D'Andrea, W.J.; Vaillencourt, D.A.; Balascio, N.L.; Werner, A.; Roof, S.R.; Retelle, M.; Bradley, R.S. Geology, Volume: 40, Issue: 11 p.: 1007-1010 (2012) 10.1130/G33365.1
Abrupt Holocene climate change as an important factor for human migration in West Greenland, D'Andrea, William J.; Huang, Yongsong; Fritz, Sherilyn C.; Anderson, N. John PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA JUN 14, Volume: 108 p.: 9765–9769 (2011)
Phylogenetic diversity and evolutionary relatedness of alkenone-producing haptophyte algae in lakes: Implications for continental paleotemperature reconstructions, Theroux, Susanna; D'Andrea, William J.; Toney, Jaime; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Huang, Yongsong EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCE LETTERS DEC 1, Volume: 300 p.: 311–320 (2010)
Holocene carbon burial by lakes in SW Greenland, Anderson, N. J.; D'Andrea, W.; Fritz, S. C. GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY NOV, Volume: 15 p.: 2590–2598 (2009)
Can sedimentary leaf waxes record D/H ratios of continental precipitation?: Field, model, and experimental assessments, Hou, Juzhi; D'Andrea, William J.; Huang, Yongsong GEOCHIMICA ET COSMOCHIMICA ACTA JUL 15, Volume: 72 p.: 3503–3517 (2008)
Evidence for water use efficiency as an important factor in determining the delta D values of tree leaf waxes, Hou, Juzhi; D'Andrea, William J.; MacDonald, Dana; Huang, Yongsong ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY, Volume: 38 p.: 1251–1255 (2007)
Hydrogen isotopic variability in leaf waxes among terrestrial and aquatic plants around Blood Pond, Massachusetts (USA), Hou, Juzhi; D'Andrea, William J.; MacDonald, Dana; Huang, Yongsong ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY, Volume: 38 p.: 977–984 (2007)
An efficient method for isolating individual long-chain alkenones for compound-specific hydrogen isotope analysis, D'Andrea, William J.; Liu, Zhonghui; Alexandre, Marcelo Da Rosa; Wattley, Sarah; Herbert, Timothy D.; Huang, Yongsong ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY MAY 1, Volume: 79 p.: 3430–3435 (2007)
Alkenone producers inferred from well-preserved 18S rDNA in Greenland lake sediments, D'Andrea, William J.; Lage, Melissa; Martiny, Jennifer B. H.; Laatsch, Abby D.; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; Huang, Yongsong JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-BIOGEOSCIENCES SEP 19, Volume: 111 p.: G03013 (2006)
Long chain alkenones in Greenland lake sediments: Low delta C-13 values and exceptional abundance, D'Andrea, W. J.; Huang, Y. ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY, Volume: 36 p.: 1234–1241 (2005)
Braddock Linsley
Personal Information
Dr.
Braddock
Linsley
Lamont Research Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information
104E Geoscience
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964
US
(845 365-8306

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150

Fields of interest: 

Coral-based paleoclimatology in the Indo-Pacific, Sediment records of Western Pacific Warm Pool and Indonesian Throughflow variability
Education
Ph.D. Geology
University of New Mexico
1990
M.S. Geology
University of South Carolina
1984
B.S. Geology
St. Lawrence University
1982
Emilie Dassie; former post doctoral scientist at LDEO
Selected Publications:
SPCZ Zonal Events and Downstream Influence on Surface Ocean Conditions in the Indonesian Throughflow Region, Linsley, Braddock K.; Wu, Henry C.; Rixen, Tim; Charles, Chris D.; Gordon, Arnold L: Moore, Michael D. Geophysical Research Letters, Volume: 43 (2016)
Decadal changes in South Pacific sea surface temperatures and the relationship to the Pacific decadal oscillation and upper ocean heat content, Linsley, Braddock K.; Wu, Henry C.; Dassie, Emilie P.; Schrag, Daniel P Geophysical Research Letters 04/2015, Volume: 42 p.: doi:10.1002/2015GL063045. (2015)
Oceanographic variability in the South Pacific Convergence Zone region over the last 210 years from multi-site coral Sr/Ca., Wu, Henry C; Linsley, BK; Dassie,EP, Schiraldi, B; deMenocal,PB Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems (2013)
Holocene Evolution of the Indonesian Throughflow and the Western Pacific Warm Pool, Linsley, B.K.; Y. Rosenthal; D. W. Oppo, Nature Geoscience 2010, Volume: 3 p.: 578-583 (2010)
Tracking the extent of the South Pacific Convergence Zone since the early 1600s, Linsley, B. K.; Kaplan, A.; Gouriou, Y.; Salinger, J.; deMenocal, P. B.; Wellington, G. M.; Howe, S. S. Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems May 3, Volume: 7 p.: - (2006) Doi 10.1029/2005gc001115
Alexander Chekalyuk
Personal Information
Alexander
Chekalyuk
Adjunct Research Scientist
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information
4 Marine Biology
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150

Fields of interest: 

Marine optics, phytoplankton photosynthesis, pigments and community structure, biogeochemical processes in the ocean, fluorescence, laser spectroscopy
Ajit Subramaniam
Personal Information
Ajit
Subramaniam
Lamont Research Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information
2 Marine Biology
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8641

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150

Fields of interest: 

Oceanography, Remote sensing, Bio-Optics, Coastal Water Quality

I am interested in the use of remote sensing, ocean optics, phytoplankton physiology, biological and physical oceanography and geographical information systems to better understand how the marine ecosystem works and can be managed. To this end, I have worked closely with biological and chemical oceanographers and ecosystem modelers, placing in-situ shipboard measurements on a broader basin-scale or global context and complementing model results with remote sensing [Capone et al. 1997, Carpenter et al. 1999, Hood et al. 2001]. We have just completed a five-year study of the Amazon River plume and its effect on the Tropical North Atlantic Ocean. My specific interest has been to develop mechanistic models that can explain why a particular organism blooms where it does, what are the factors that cause the bloom, that lead to its demise and the consequences of these blooms. I am also interested in using bio-optics and remote sensing as tools for monitoring coastal water quality and have been working with the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority towards this goal. I am working on developing a site-specific algorithm for SeaWiFS data to provide a daily synoptic time series of water quality at a sewage outfall site in Massachusetts Bay.

Some of my projects include:

  • Potential Impacts of Rivers and Aerosols on Nitrogen fixation in the Atlantic ocean ( details )
  • Nitrogen Fixation in the Global Ocean ( details )
  • Using Ocean Color Satellite Data for Monitoring Water Quality
Education
Ph.D. in Coastal Oceanography
State University of New York at Stony Brook
1995
M.S. in Marine Environmental Sciences
State University of New York at Stony Brook
1989
B.Sc. Physics (Special)
The American College
1984
Selected Publications:
Influence of the Amazon River plume on distributions of free-living and symbiotic cyanobacteria in the western tropical north Atlantic Ocean, Foster, R. A.; Subramaniam, A.; Mahaffey, C.; Carpenter, E. J.; Capone, D. G.; Zehr, J. P. Limnology and Oceanography Mar, Volume: 52, Issue: 2 p.: 517-532 (2007)
Biomass and primary productivity of the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium spp. in the tropical N Atlantic ocean, Carpenter, E. J.; Subramaniam, A.; Capone, D. G. Deep-Sea Research Part I-Oceanographic Research Papers Feb, Volume: 51, Issue: 2 p.: 173-203 (2004) DOI 10.1016/j.dsr.2003.10.006
Detecting Trichodesmium blooms in SeaWiFS imagery, Subramaniam, A.; Brown, C. W.; Hood, R. R.; Carpenter, E. J.; Capone, D. G. Deep-Sea Research Part Ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography, Volume: 49, Issue: 1-3 p.: 107-121 (2002)
Bio-optical properties of the marine diazotrophic cyanobacteria Trichodesmium spp. II. A reflectance model for remote sensing, Subramaniam, A.; Carpenter, E. J.; Falkowski, P. G. Limnology and Oceanography May, Volume: 44, Issue: 3 p.: 618-627 (1999)
Bio-optical properties of the marine diazotrophic cyanobacteria Trichodesmium spp. I. Absorption and photosynthetic action spectra, Subramaniam, A.; Carpenter, E. J.; Karentz, D.; Falkowski, P. G. Limnology and Oceanography May, Volume: 44, Issue: 3 p.: 608-617 (1999)
Raymond N. Sambrotto
Personal Information
Raymond
N.
Sambrotto
Lamont Associate Research Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information
13 Geochemistry
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8402

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150

My research is in the area of biological and chemical aquatic science and focuses on microbial life in the ocean and coastal waters.  A large part of my work pertains to the microbial photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) of the ocean.  Phytoplankton are responsible for almost half of the total photosynthesis on the planet.  Due to the fact that phytoplankton are the base of the marine food web, phytoplankton ecology contributes to the analysis of the production of fish, birds and mammals in the sea.  Plankton also play a large role in the carbon cycle and other biogeochemical cycles in the sea.   Phytoplankton growth redistributes material from the surface of the ocean to depth and exchanges material with bacteria and ocean water throughout the water column and sediments.  These are critical steps that determine ocean nutrient levels as well as help to define the ocean's role in the adsorption of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.  I typically work in large, oceanographic,  field programs to investigate how ocean production systems respond to changes caused by climatic variation, particularly in polar regions.

Selected Publications:
Biogeochemistry: Ocean biomes blended, Sambrotto, R. N. Nature 30 Sept. 2010, Volume: 467 p.: 538–539 (2010) 10.1038/467538a
Compound-specific carbon isotopes from Earth?s largest flood basalt province directly link eruptions to the end-Triassic mass extinction Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Whiteside, JH; Olsen, PE; Eglinton, T; Brookfield, ME; Sambrotto, RN Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Volume: 107, Issue: 15 p.: 6721-6725 (2010)
Physical forcing and nutrient conditions associated with patterns of Chl a and phytoplankton productivity in the southeastern Bering Sea during summer, Sambrotto, R. N.; Mordy, C.; Zeeman, S. I.; Stabeno, P. J.; Macklin, S. A. Deep-Sea Research Part Ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography Aug, Volume: 55, Issue: 16-17 p.: 1745-1760 (2008) DOI 10.1016/j.dsr2.2008.03.003
Net community production in terms of C, N, P and Si in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and its influence on regional water mass characteristics, Green, S. E.; Sambrotto, R. N. Deep-Sea Research Part I-Oceanographic Research Papers Jan, Volume: 53, Issue: 1 p.: 111-135 (2006) DOI 10.1016/j.dsr.2005.04.008
Plankton community structure and export of C, N, P and Si in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, Green, S. E.; Sambrotto, R. N. Deep-Sea Research Part Ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography, Volume: 53, Issue: 5-7 p.: 620-643 (2006) DOI 10.1016/j.dsr2.2006.01.022
Ratios of Si, C and N uptake by microplankton in the Southern Ocean, Brzezinski, M. A.; Dickson, M. L.; Nelson, D. M.; Sambrotto, R. Deep-Sea Research Part Ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography, Volume: 50, Issue: 3-4 p.: 619-633 (2003) Pii S0967-0645(02)00587-8
A role for ocean biota in tropical intraseasonal atmospheric variability (vol 30, art no 1460, 2003), Gildor, H.; Sobel, A. H.; Cane, M. A.; Sambrotto, R. N. Geophysical Research Letters Jun 21, Volume: 30, Issue: 12 p.: - (2003) Doi 10.1029/2003gl017803
Effect of feeding on the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition in the tissues and skeleton of the zooxanthellate coral Stylophora pistillata, Reynaud, S.; Ferrier-Pages, C.; Sambrotto, R.; Juillet-Leclerc, A.; Jaubert, J.; Gattuso, J. P. Marine Ecology-Progress Series, Volume: 238 p.: 81-89 (2002)
Nitrogen production in the northern Arabian Sea during the Spring Intermonsoon and Southwest Monsoon seasons, Sambrotto, R. N. Deep-Sea Research Part Ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography, Volume: 48, Issue: 6-7 p.: 1173-1198 (2001)
Coupling of biological and physical regimes across the Antarctic Polar Front as reflected by nitrogen production and recycling, Sambrotto, R. N.; Mace, B. J. Deep-Sea Research Part Ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography, Volume: 47, Issue: 15-16 p.: 3339-3367 (2000)
Joaquim Goes
Personal Information
Joaquim
Goes
Lamont Research Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information
7 Marine Biology
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8467

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150

Fields of interest: 

a) Marine phytoplankton physiology and productivity b) Climate change and its impact on ocean biota and biogeochemical processes c) Development of ocean color and other remote sensing algorithms and methods for studying ocean carbon cycling and air-s

My major research efforts have been directed at understanding the structure and functioning of plankton ecosystems and their response to physical forcing so that a capability can be developed to forecast responses of marine ecosystems to global change (Goes et al, 2001. 2004, 2005; Limsakul et al., 2001). For my research work I rely on an approach that examines phytoplankton at the cellular level, where changes in phytoplankton cell physiology, biochemistry and optical properties are studied as a means of evaluating their role and response to changes in the environment (Goes et al., 2002). With the help of empirical or semi-analytical modeling techniques, information obtained at the cellular level is then extrapolated to regional and global scales using data from satellites and ships. Research on this front has led to the development of satellite based methods that have made it possible to assess how large-scale climatic events such as El-Niño and La Niña, the North Atlantic Oscillation impact atmospheric CO2 draw down by phytoplankton (export production). (Goes et al, 200, 2004) Ship and satellite studies, currently underway in the Arabian Sea, have provided the first indications of rapid ecosystem changes being brought about by global warming and the rapid decline in snow over the Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau region (Goes et al.,2005, Gomes et al., 2008; 2009). Bio-optical and phytoplankton physiological studies being undertaken in the Bering Sea are aiding in the development of regional satellite ocean color algorithms that will help assess how the Bering Sea shelf ecosystem is responding to changes in sea-ice concentrations. In the Amazon River Plume, ship and satellite are being collected to help understand the influence of the Amazon River on the pelagic ecosystem, carbon cycling and sequestration in the tropical north Atlantic and the sensitivity of this ecosystem to anthropogenic climate change.

Education
Doctor of Science
Nagoya University, Japan
05/1996
Master of Science
Bombay University
09/1985
Bachelor of Science
Bombay University
06/1980
Neil Pederson
Personal Information
Neil
Pederson
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Biology and Paleo Environment
Contact Information

Fields of interest: 

Terrestrial Ecosystems, Dendrochronology, Dendroclimatology, Forest Ecosystems, Disturbance Ecology
Education
Ph.D.
Columbia University
08/2005
MS
Auburn University
08/1994
BS
State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry
12/1990
AS
State University of New York Morrisville Ag & Tech
05/1988
Selected Publications:
Temperature and precipitation in Mongolia based on dendroclimatic investigations, Jacoby, G.; Pederson, N.; D'Arrigo, R. Chinese Science Bulletin Jul, Volume: 48, Issue: 14 p.: 1474-1479 (2003) Doi 10.1360/02wd0390
1738 years of Mongolian temperature variability inferred from a tree-ring width chronology of Siberian pine, D'Arrigo, R.; Jacoby, G.; Frank, D.; Pederson, N.; Cook, E.; Buckley, B.; Nachin, B.; Mijiddorj, R.; Dugarjav, C. Geophysical Research Letters Feb 1, Volume: 28, Issue: 3 p.: 543-546 (2001)
Hydrometeorological reconstructions for northeastern Mongolia derived from tree rings: 1651-1995, Pederson, N.; Jacoby, G. C.; D'Arrigo, R. D.; Cook, E. R.; Buckley, B. M.; Dugarjav, C.; Mijiddorj, R. Journal of Climate, Volume: 14, Issue: 5 p.: 872-881 (2001)
Monogolian tree-rings, temperature sensitivity and reconstructions of Northern Hemisphere temperature, D'Arrigo, R.; Jacoby, G.; Pederson, N.; Frank, D.; Buckley, B.; Nachin, B.; Mijiddorj, R.; Dugarjav, C. Holocene Nov, Volume: 10, Issue: 6 p.: 669-672 (2000)
Temperature and precipitation in Mongolia based on dendroclimatic investigations, Jacoby, G.; D'Arrigo, R.; Pederson, N.; Buckley, B.; Dugarjav, C.; Mijiddorj, R. Iawa Journal, Volume: 20, Issue: 3 p.: 339-350 (1999)
Andrew Juhl
Personal Information
Andrew
Juhl
Lamont Associate Research Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Biology and Paleo Environment
Biology and Paleo Environment
Adjunct Associate Professor
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Contact Information
2A Marine Biology
61 Route 9W - PO Box 1000
Palisades
NY
10964-8000
US
(845) 365-8837

Fax: 

(845) 365-8150

Fields of interest: 

Plankton ecology, Phytoplankton growth and physiology, Zooplankton grazing, Harmful algae, Dinoflagellate blooms, Physical/biological interactions, Nutrient/microbial pollution of coastal waters, Sea-ice algae

As an aquatic ecologist and oceanographer, my research and teaching focus on how aquatic microorganisms and their predators interact with each other and their physical/chemical environment. I emphasize a holistic perspective encompassing the range of planktonic organisms found in coastal marine systems, estuaries, rivers and lakes, including: planktonic algae, protist microzooplankton, invertebrate zooplankton, and bacteria.

My research approach links hypothesis-driven, controlled laboratory experiments with small-scale field manipulations and field observations. Such research is inherently interdisciplinary, connecting cell biology and physiology with ecology, and physics and chemistry of the environment. My work finds application in addressing basic and applied questions related to aquatic geochemical fluxes, harmful algal blooms, pollution and water quality, and sea ice ecology

Please see my website for more information.

Education
Ph.D. - Biological Oceanography
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego
2000
M. S. - Biological Oceanography
College of Oceanography, Oregon State University
1991
B.S. - Zoology
University of Wisconsin, Madison
1988
Selected Publications:
Effects of snow removal and algal photoadaptation on growth and export of ice algae, Juhl, AR; Krembs, C Polar Biology p.: DOI 101007/s00300-010-0784-1 (In Press)
Reevaluation of the role of naked, amoeboid protists in bactivory and microbial carbon flux in the Hudson River Estuary., Lesen, A.; Juhl, A. R.; Anderson, O. R. Aquatic Microbial Ecology, Volume: 61 p.: 45-56 (2010)
Toxicity of Alexandrium lusitanicum to gastropod larvae is not caused by paralytic-shellfish-poisoning toxins, Juhl, A. R.; Martins, C. A.; Anderson, D. M. Harmful Algae Aug, Volume: 7, Issue: 5 p.: 567-573 (2008) DOI 10.1016/j.hal.2007.12.019
Nutrient limitation of phytoplankton growth and physiology in a subtropical estuary (Pensacola Bay, Florida), Juhl, A. R.; Murrell, M. C. Bulletin of Marine Science Jan, Volume: 82, Issue: 1 p.: 59-82 (2008)

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